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Getting Cybersecurity Right: How Employee Communications Can Save Your Business
EXECUTIVE BRIEF

Getting Cybersecurity Right: How Employee Communications Can Save Your Business

About this Executive Brief

As more and more organizations embrace the hybrid work model, there’s an increase in cybercrime risk—and all sensible organizations are looking for ways to boost their cybersecurity measures. Typically, the responsibility falls on IT teams to ensure that all the employees in the workplace know the importance of cybersecurity and the steps they must take to stay safe. But a weak link in your cybersecurity strategy could be enough to bring down your organization’s infrastructure and have a major impact on your bottom line.

So, what can you do to decrease the risk? It all starts with communication, because employees are typically the weakest links for attackers. Organizations must therefore have in place a proactive cybersecurity communication strategy with their people, based
on three distinct phases:

  1. Engaging people in comms aimed at preventing an attack
  2. Essential communications during an attack
  3. Communications in the aftermath of an attack

In this executive brief, based on a webinar by Poppulo’s Head of IT, Tom Meade, and Poppulo Director Caroline Daly, we’ll dive into how businesses can use employee communication to save their businesses.

Author

 Christine Kendall

Christine Kendall

Content Marketing Manager, Poppulo

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